Archives for July 2021

Litigation Update: Cause of Action Institute Forces Department of Commerce to Release 232 Uranium Report

On the eve of oral argument before the District Court for the District of Columbia, the Department of Commerce says it intends to publish its Section 232 report on the “Effect of Imports of Uranium on the National Security” tomorrow, July 29, 2021, in a just-filed motion:

On July 29, 2021, Commerce intends to publish the Uranium Report on its website and, on August 2, 2021, it intends to publish the report in the Federal Register. Undersigned counsel has been authorized to represent that the Office of the President has agreed with this course of action.

Cause of Action Institute originally filed FOIA requests for the report over two years ago on April 15, 2019, and filed suit on September 10, 2019.

Ryan Mulvey, counsel at CoA Institute:

We are pleased that the Department of Commerce finally decided to provide transparency on this report, but It should not have taken a FOIA lawsuit to force release when the 232 statute requires publishing reports in the Federal Register. 232 reports are paid for by taxpayers and serve an important role in keeping the tariff process transparent.

The remaining issues in the lawsuit include a “policy or practice” claim, which CoA Institute is using to seek judicial review of Commerce’s systematic approach of denying access to Section 232 reports, and the failure of agency to provide the response letter from the Department of Defense.

232 Uranium Report Documents:

More information about CoA Institute’s FOIA litigation for the 232 Auto-Tariff report:

Herring fishermen appeal district court decision upholding industry-killing at-sea monitoring regulations

Washington D.C. – Cause of Action Institute today filed a notice of appeal to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit on behalf of several family-owned fishing companies based in New Jersey, who hope to block a new regulation that would force them to pay for third-party “at-sea monitors.”  That regulation—which was designed by the New England Fishery Management Council and promulgated by the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration—requires certain boats in the Atlantic herring fishery to carry “at-sea monitors” and at industry’s cost, all without congressional authorization.

Last month, Judge Emmet Sullivan of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia granted the government’s motion for summary judgment, ruling federal regulators had statutory authorization to force fishermen to bear the cost of monitoring, regardless of the severe economic impacts and lack of scientific justification.  Judge Sullivan also discounted procedural deficiencies in the government’s rulemaking, including its prejudgment of the legality of industry funding.

Jeff Kaelin, Director of Sustainability and Government Relations at Lund’s Fisheries, Inc., and representative for the New Jersey plaintiffs:

The district court reached an unfortunate decision, providing deference to the government, which is enforcing the industry-funded monitoring program without the statutory authority to do so.  The commercial herring fleet has been over-regulated for years, but with little demonstrated biological benefit to the Atlantic herring resource itself.  Industry-funded monitoring, along with reduced quotas and other burdensome regulations, is forcing some herring fishermen out of business and increasing costs to those who still hope to hang on.  The district court’s decision is likely to perpetuate that trend.  We are grateful for the work Cause of Action Institute has undertaken, and we look forward to pursuing our appeal at the D.C. Circuit.  In the end, we hope the rule of law will prevail.

Ryan P. Mulvey, Counsel at Cause of Action Institute:

We aim to convince the D.C. Circuit that Judge Sullivan’s ruling is contrary to the law and facts.  The federal government has overextended its regulatory power far beyond what Congress authorized.  The Magnuson-Stevens Act simply does not give the government and fishery management councils a blank check to regulate according to their whim. The imposition of industry-funded at-sea monitoring is likely to weigh down an already beleaguered commercial fishing industry.

The herring fishermen filed their lawsuit in February 2020.  Further information is available here and here.

Media Contact: James Valvo, james.valvo@causeofaction.org | (571) 482-4182

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